Travel Guide: Santiago & Easter Island

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Finally: the long-awaited Chile post! Long…that’s a good description for the journey there. Living in Bermuda of course adds a minimum of two hours to almost any flight path, one more jump to the southern U.S. and then we had eight hours direct to Santiago. I didn’t sleep very well, but check out our sunrise view of the coastal mountain range (above)!

I think your brain is always trying to make associations with things that are familiar to you, so my first impression was that it felt just like flying into Salt Lake City. And then, I saw the Andes.

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They are absolutely breathtaking and indescribably huge… unlike anything I’ve ever seen before.

We stayed at the W Santiago, which was sort of in the business and financial area of the city, so it was a pretty quiet neighborhood. Because we arrived bright and early in the morning, we couldn’t get into our room right away, so we checked our luggage and explored the city for a few hours.

First stop: coffee (remember that part where I didn’t get much sleep?). I was looking forward to practicing my Spanish, but almost everyone we encountered spoke better English than my broken, and I’m sure terribly accented, Spanish.

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Andrew and I both like to walk through neighborhoods to get a sense of a place. We slowly moseyed toward the mall at the base of Costanera Center Gran Torre—the tallest building in South America. Seriously, a mall? I know. I used to avoid them like the plague, but living on a small island makes you appreciate being able to do all your shopping in one building. We got a few things like rain jackets (those came in handy later on the trip, plus we both needed a new one for back home!), and discovered Cruz Verde, which is sort of like a Walmart (again, I know, gross, but we needed some packaged snacks).

Then, we took the elevator all 64 stories to the very top of the tower—your ears pop on the way up. The view is incredible: You’re eye-to-eye with the tops of the Andes (that first picture of them was taken from the tower), and the entire city sprawls out in front of you. We could even see our hotel!

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By the time we got back down to solid ground, we had killed enough time for our room to be ready so we headed back to shower. Yay showers! We had a big day tomorrow, so we headed for an early dinner at Happenings, which was a lovely steakhouse. When I say early, I mean we left the hotel at 6:30, which is just barely on the early side for us… but apparently early bird special status for Chileans! There was only one other (English-speaking) table seated when we arrived, and the host looked downright surprised to have guests already. You guys, there were families with young kids just walking in while we were paying our bill a few hours later. We were so not on Chile time.

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But we did have an awesome meal—a delicious prawn appetizer, Andrew had a steak (of course!) and I had a lamb entrée that could have easily fed two people. Like proper old folks, we had one drink at our hotel before heading up to our room for an early bed time!

The next day was wine tour day! This ended up being our favorite day in Santiago—but not for the reason you might think! We hired a guide, so he drove us through the stunning valleys that surround Santiago, and we also enjoyed some of the best food of the entire trip.

Our first stop was a darling restaurant, empty at 11 a.m. except for the owner and her dog, who was cozied up by the wood stove (it was winter in South America, remember!). We had our first authentic Chilean empanadas, and THEY. WERE. AWESOME. Seriously so good, and exactly what we needed to start the day. Our guide had also brought a really nice red that went well with the meal and was mild enough to drink before noon.

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You guys, this place was legit. Our tour guide even called his wife to see how many empanadas she wanted him to bring home!

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Our first winery was Emiliana—which is an organic, sustainably run vineyard. After a very impressive tour given in both English and Spanish by this lovely young lady below, we enjoyed a flight of some of their most popular wines.

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Oops, I accidentally drank from that first glass before I took a picture. Couldn’t wait!

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Part of Emiliana’s commitment to sustainability is also a commitment to their employees. They offer personal garden space and the fruits of their olive trees to the workers, and sell the resulting olive oil in the shop, with all the profits going to directly to the growers. Oh, and they also had alpacas (the workers get to keep the wool), so that was entertaining!

IMG_3514We then headed next door to Vina Morande for a gourmet four-course lunch paired with their wines. This was definitely the best meal we had on the trip—featuring lots of fresh seafood prepared by an amazing chef, who even came out to our table after the meal. Below is a squid ink risotto in an incredible broth, topped with mussels, shrimp and the most flavorful grape tomatoes. So tasty!IMG_3548

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Our last winery was Bodegas RE—another organic winery, which makes their wine in giant cement vats. Similar to the ancient tradition of storing wine in clay containers, it creates a decidedly different, fresh flavor.

On the way home, we stopped at a road-side sweet shop and bakery, where we picked up amazing confections featuring home made dolce de leche… my new obsession!

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By the time we got back to the hotel, we were recovering from both a wine buzz and a sugar high, so despite our best intentions, that was the end of our night!

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The following day was our last in Santiago, so we wanted to take in a bit of local culture. We took the metro (which was totally seamless and easy to understand) out to Pueblito Los Dominicos market. It was actually a collection of small, permanent shops, which was different than what I expected, but we had an awesome traditional lunch and then shopped local artisans’ work. I bought some jewelry—lapis lazuli is the thing here—and a few textiles. The alpaca knits were so incredible, I wanted to buy them all… but they’re just not something I need in Bermuda!

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IMG_3623After that, Andrew wanted to check out the old part of the city where all the government buildings are, so we hopped on the metro again to check that out. Not too much happening there on a Sunday afternoon, but the architecture was beautiful!

Then headed to the Santa Lucia neighborhood, where there was supposed to be another market, but it was late afternoon and it had closed for the day. Completely by accident, we stumbled upon the Neptune Fountain, which is another tourist hot spot I didn’t even know about!

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The next day was our travel day to Easter Island! Also known as Isla de Pascua (in Spanish) and Rapa Nui, after the native people, it’s a nearly six hour flight from Santiago—about twice as far as I expected when we were first planning this trip! In fact, it’s nearly equidistant to Tahiti, which is the only other place you can catch a flight to the island.

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After being greeted at the teeny tiny airport with leis from our shuttle driver, we had a five minute ride to our eco-resort, Hotel Hanga Roa. Andrew had booked this one, so I didn’t really know what to expect, but the campus was absolutely gorgeous! The lobby and rooms had concrete and river stone floors and trees incorporated into the walls—the perfect mix of modern and natural. And the rooms had grass roofs!IMG_3657

Our room looked across the coastal road right out onto the water. We could watch the waves crash on shore and the sunset every night! In fact, we did twice!

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That afternoon, we walked into town to stretch our legs and get our bearings—and not 10 minutes in, we saw our first Moai! We were pretty excited, but that’s just because we had no idea what was to come. IMG_3726

The next day, our tour guide José Ika (that’s him mid-sentence above) picked us up at our hotel, grabbed a couple other tourists in town and headed for the far side of the island. Easter Island is only about 15 miles at its widest point, but since we weren’t on the main paved road that cuts through the center of the island, it was a little bit of a drive.

Since much of the island is a national park, the land in front of us seemed vast as soon as we left town. According to Ika, centuries ago the island was covered in forests, but now the rocky rolling hills are mostly grass. The coastline is almost all rocks and cliffs too, so the waves crashing were mesmerizing and epic on such a windy day. IMG_3691 IMG_3703

Our first few stops were at ahu (the sacred platforms on which the statues sit) where the moai had been pushed over. More on why further down, but I thought it was great that our tour started here, we felt an awe for the face-down moai that I think would have been lost had we already seen dozens of them standing tall.

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When I say dozens, I’m not exaggerating. This is Ahu Tongariki, the most impressive collection of restored moai, courtesy of the Japanese government. That little guy in the foreground of the photo above was loaned to a Japanese museum for a year, and in return they restored an area that had been devastated by an earthquake.  IMG_3859 IMG_3830

So, what is the deal with all these statues? They’re huge, they weight literal tons, they were obviously a huge undertaking and very costly in ancient times (and would be even now!). So why bother? Religion, of course.

Ika is a descendant of the Rapa Nui, the native people of Easter Island. I loved hearing the stories from someone who still has a vested interest in the history of these sacred lands and sculptures. So, here’s how he told it:

From about 800 to 1800 AD, the Rapa Nui people built moai to house the souls of their deceased chiefs. The moai were carved from basalt rock from one of the island’s three volcanoes, as dictated to them by the Makemake god. The statues took years to carve, as each was created by a single specialized craftsman. When a chief died, the tribe bought a moai from the quarry (the size depended on the wealth of the tribe at the time), and then it was transported to the tribe’s ahu. How statues with an average weight of 14 tons were transported by ancient people is still up for debate—read all about the various theories here.

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Once they were in position, the new chief—the deceased’s son—described specific characteristics to the craftsman, who turned a generic face into a likeness of the former chief. They added a red stone topknot (chiefs never cut their hair, just wrapped it around and around on top of their head), white coral eyes (most of which are now gone), and performed a sacred ritual to transfer the chief’s soul into the moai, which is now called an aringa ora, because it represents a specific person.

The new chief could now consult with his father and other former chiefs on tribal matters and seek their advice. Pretty handy, huh?

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So that belief system served the Rapa Nui well for a thousand years or so until European explorers, as they tend to do, arrived and ruined it all. Basically, Ika said, the aringa ora had never seen the explorers’ ships and guns, so they could offer the leadership no insight about them. In awe of their technology and disillusioned with the lack of wisdom coming from the old chiefs, many tribes abandoned their beliefs, took the eyes from the statues and pushed them over. Others were toppled by natural events (like that earthquake I mentioned), and still others were plundered by other nations.

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Our last stop for the day was that quarry on Rano Raraku, the holy volcano. More than half the moai (and these are actually moai—just generic faces) are still in the quarry, either abandoned before completion (check out sleeping beauty below, still attached to the base rock), or never purchased by a tribe. Still others toppled over or broke during transport, and there’s a trail of abandoned moai leading away from Rano Raraku.

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This is the place for all those iconic Easter Island photos—and why a lot of people believe they don’t have bodies. These moai are just partially buried—they have bodies just like the aringa ora.

The quarry was my favorite part of the island because you could get so close to the statues. They are so big and so ancient, and although you have to stay on the path, you are often within just a few feet of them (and can do ridiculous things like this). It was all seriously amazing!

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Phew! Are you sick of these giant heads yet? Me either :) But the next day, we rented scooters (thanks for making me an expert, Bermuda!) and drove up to check out some of the dormant volcanoes. These giant calderas give the moai a run for their money as the coolest thing on the island!

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The only bodies of fresh water on the island, these long-dormant volcanoes are also its highest peaks. Here’s the view of Hanga Roa from up there!IMG_4019

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And the rest of the island… so gorgeous!

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Along one side of the Rano Kau crater are the remains of the birdman cult, the religion that filled the void left by the moai. Each spring, competitors swam to the island to await the arrival of migratory birds. The first person to return to the village of Orongo with an egg gave it to his wealthy sponsor, who would then offer it to the gods by way of the volcano.

Since this religion was more recent than the others, and they lived in stone houses, there was quite a lot left of the village, which was very cool to see. (Kind of reminds you of our hotel, no?)

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We spent our last day revisiting some of our favorite sites and checking out a few more maoi we hadn’t had a chance to see.

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We also did a little off-road scootering followed by a hike to a cave! We actually had a little trouble finding it, because the exterior basically just looks like a pile of rocks, and as a less-popular tourist attraction, it wasn’t marked. Luckily, there were some Chileans who knew what they were doing about five minutes ahead of us, so we caught them before they disappeared and they showed us where to enter. IMG_4311

It was a small cave and not much to look at compared to the ones in Bermuda, but it offered two openings onto the sea cliffs which was really cool! IMG_4319

Writing this, I’m realizing how much we saw in just 63 square miles! The next day we took a four hour flight back to Santiago, did a little more shopping while we were in the city, and caught an overnight flight back to the U.S.

It was a truly awesome trip, you should definitely add Chile to your travel bucket list!

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Travel Guide: New Orleans

New Orleans is quite possibly my favorite vacation destination. I love the atmosphere (off Bourbon Street, that is), the architecture, the cocktails, the food—oh and one of my best friends has lived there since right after high school. So, inspired by my fifth visit a few weeks ago, here’s your guide!

Where to eat: I quite literally plan my days around meals in New Orleans, so this category comes first this time around! The absolute must for breakfast is of course Cafe du Monde. Go to the iconic location on Jackson Square—there will be a line on Saturday and Sunday, but it’s absolutely worth it for the best beignets and chicory coffee IN THE WORLD. Not exaggerating!

IMG_5054I would be content with beignets every morning, but if you need more variety in your breakfast fare, the Jazz Brunch at The Court of Two Sisters is absolutely incredible. You’d need two or three mornings to try everything, but if you’ve only got one, make sure to pick up as many crawfish and shrimp dishes as possible! Oh, and their biscuits are amazing. Ruby Slipper Cafe is another fantastic brunch spot—they don’t take reservations and there will be a wait, but it’s worth it! And their mimosas are great… and consist primarily of very tasty Champagne!

Lunch… mmm… lunch… There are so many options! Definitely make sure to get a po-boy at some point. This time around, I tried Mothers’ debris and gravy (that’s the meat that falls off the roast while it’s slowly cooking, along with a healthy helping of the flavorful juice) and it was awesome!

IMG_5057Regional specialties abound at the French Market—po-boys, crawfish, gumbo…. This time I tried Meals From the Heart Cafe’s crab cakes. Really crabby, really good, you can even get them gluten free if you’re in to that.

For a sit-down lunch or casual dinner, my number one choice is Gumbo Shop. I’m incredibly disappointed I didn’t get there this trip, I always get the Crawfish Combo Platter (with etouffee of course!) so I can get a little bit of everything! In years past, Cochon has also been a hit. If you end up venturing out of the French Quarter, try The Avenue Pub in the Garden District. They have a ridiculous number of beers on tap and their frites are uh-maz-ing!

The best part about knowing a local (besides knowing her, of course!) is getting out of the touristy areas and having and experience closer to real life in the city. For me, this of course means restaurants, and this trip that meant Capdeville. They specialize in whiskeys, I beleive, but the thing I remember most are the red beans and rice balls. They’re like Italian arancini, but made from the New Orleans staple. So tasty!

Honestly, there are too many amazing dinner places to name them all, but one of my favorite memories is K-Paul’s. Remember Chef Paul Prudhomme from the early days of food TV? He’s the big guy with the beard and beret, the “Magic” seasoning mixes, and a nearly 40-year-old standby restaurant. It’s heavy and southern and indulgent and absolutely delicious. He was even there when we went! This trip, we tried EAT New Orleans which was very good! And they were able to handle our 14-person party with no problem.

You really can’t go wrong. One of the best things about New Orleans is that they don’t let crappy (or good, for that matter!) chains open within the city limits. On top of that, the food scene is so vibrant, every restaurant has had to fight to survive—which means it’s really well done. Some of the best meals I’ve had were at restaurants I never even learned the names of—I couldn’t go back there if I tried… although I’m still dreaming of those corn and lobster beignets…

Where to drink: Again, you almost can’t go wrong (unless you order a blended drink on Bourbon Street. Then you’re just asking for trouble… and gut rot). I really appreciated the skill of NOLA bartenders this trip, as that’s a bit hard to come by in Bermuda. I had some delicious Old Fashioneds of course, but I also made a point to ask for a cocktail menu—something they don’t look down on here—and try something unique.

A don’t-miss spot for me is the Carousel Bar in Hotel Monteleone. First of all, the main bar is topped with an actual carousel roof and it moves. The entire bar, the stools, wells and bartenders all rotate slowly—if you glance at it, you might not notice, but if you’re standing outside the bar stools, you’ll have to take a step every few minutes to catch up. Even more importantly, the space is elegant and beautiful, far enough to the edge of the Quarter that it’s usually not too crazy, and they make amazing craft cocktails. My favorite is the Ginger Royal, a mix of bourbon, Champagne and who knows what else.

This trip we also hit up Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, which despite being on Bourbon Street, is actually pretty cool.

DSCF4240What to do: Walk around! This last trip we were lucky to stay in the Marigny/Bywater area, which is a bit east of the Quarter. We were nestled in a residential neighborhood, so we got to see a lot of the beautiful architecture: Shotgun houses mixed in with Creole cottages and grand mansions, brick sidewalks and ferns hanging from every porch.

DSCF4204Since you’ll be starting your day at Cafe du Monde in Jackson Square anyway, start there. Explore the blocks between Decatur and Bourbon or all the way up to Burgundy—get some pralines, explore the shops, have a beer, maybe pick up some sidewalk art. There are carriages lined up at the square and I’d highly recommend a ride, although perhaps wait until the evening.

One end of Decatur (which it splits into St. Peter’s) in the Quarter ends with chain shops and Harrah’s Casino, but at the other end, you’ll find the French Market, the oldest public market in the country. I’ve touched on the food offerings already, but you’ll also find jewelry and accessories, art and gifts here.

Once you’re French Quarter-ed out (or just tired of walking), hop on a streetcar to the Garden District. You must have exact change ($1.25 at the moment), and it moves slooowwww, but that’s good—you’ll get a chance to look at all the amazing houses in this neighborhood. And really, the streetcar is an adventure by itself.

Yes, there are museums and tours you can take, but I think the best thing about vacationing in New Orleans is just being there, settling in and letting whatever adventures come your way happen. Enjoy!

Travel Guide: Bermuda

This week has been one for writing. One of the pieces I worked on was a guest post for Dutch beauty and travel blog, The Beauty Suitcase. It was of course a Bermuda travel guide! I thought you guys would be interested in the highlight reel as well, although I’ve condensed it so as not to repeat things I’ve already said here, but if you’re interested in the full version (or haven’t been following along on my Bermuda adventures), click here!


The moment you step off the plane in Bermuda (onto a stair car, they don’t have jet bridges here), the first thing you’ll notice is the humidity: pleasantly warm but thick, wet air. Depending on the time of the year, it can be wonderfully refreshing—not to mention great for your skin—or almost overwhelming (and if you have curly hair, forget about taming it until you go home!).

There are plenty of taxis waiting at the airport—with just a handful of flights per day, they know when to arrive—so you won’t have any trouble getting a ride, however very few of them take cards, so make sure you have cash. The Bermudian dollar is tied to the U.S. dollar, so everyone uses both interchangeably. It’s very convenient for us Americans, but sort of confusing once you remember you’re actually in a British territory (and no, they don’t accept pounds!).

I remember some of my first impressions of the island: First, the water is far and away the brightest, bluest water I’ve ever seen in my life. It seems to be lit from below with a turquoise light—absolutely stunning. Foliage reminds me of South Carolina—a mix of deciduous and palm trees—which is less tropical-feeling than I expected. And there was something about the infrastructure (roads and public buildings anyway) that reminded me of the Caribbean or Central America.

As tourism is a big business here, there are plenty of hotels and I really haven’t heard many bad reviews about any of them. Keep in mind that “town” here means one thing: Hamilton. If you’re looking to be where the action is without spending a lot of money on transportation, I’d recommend staying at the Fairmont Hamilton Princess, which is within walking distance of everything. The Princess’ sister hotel, Fairmont Southampton, is perfect if you’re more in the mood for a beach vacation, and they offer a ferry back and forth between hotels.

 

Highlights

Where to go: The main drag of Hamilton is Front Street, which—you guessed it—is right on the waterfront. Much of the shopping here is tailored to cruise ship arrivals, so there are several high-end stores and gift shops. If you go one block back from the water to Reid Street, you’ll get a better picture of everyday life for Bermudians. Spend some time walking around town, getting a sense of the place. Europeans may not find it as exciting, but there is history here that most of America just can’t match. Even the post office feels like you’ve stepped back in time a few centuries. There is a national portrait museum and aquarium of course, but for touristy activities, I’d recommend getting out of town.

Lest you think Bermuda is just beaches and palm trees... This is Front Street, the main drag of the city of Hamilton
Front Street, the main drag of the city of Hamilton

What to do: You can hop on the ferry for just a few dollars and sail directly to Dockyard, which is where the cruise ships usually dock. It’s an old Navy yard, and very cool to spend some time walking through the lawns between the old walls. There are a number of bars and restaurants—including one on a boat decked out to look like a pirate ship—and what I’d wager is the best mini golf in the world! I know it sounds silly, but Fun Golf’s nearly 360-degree ocean views can’t be matched.

If you’re feeling adventurous, rent a scooter instead of taking the ferry so you can take in the views along Middle and South roads on the way back. There are really only three roads that run the length of the island, so you can’t get lost, but driving can be a little bit crazy. Take a break by pulling in to any of the lay-bys along the way so you can see the stunning parks and beaches that dot the south coast.

PortRoyalBermuda is a golfer’s paradise—there are seven high quality courses to choose from within the island’s twenty square miles. Port Royal recently hosted the PGA Grand Slam (that’s Rory McIlroy in the pic!), and Tucker’s Point (back toward the airport) is also very nice. Tucker’s has a fabulous spa, hotel and restaurant as well, so you could make a day or two of it! It’s near the airport, so I’d recommend staying here at the very beginning or very end of your trip.

The view from the pool at Tucker's Point
The view from the pool at Tucker’s Point

Also in that area is Grotto Bay, a resort that has ocean rentals in a protected bay. Rent a boat or paddleboard and head over to Castle Island beach—only accessible by water (except for the people who own the private land adjacent to it) and very shallow, it’s a great place to drop anchor and hang out for the day!

I’d be remiss if I didn’t recommend heading out to St. George’s, the first permanent English settlement on the island, and arguably North America. Settled in 1612, the town is an UNESCO World Heritage site and totally worth the visit, with reenactments, tours and, most exciting for me, a printing museum!

Where to eat: Dining here is a bit hit or miss, but you usually can’t go wrong with seafood! I’m not a huge fan of cooked fish, but I love sushi. Two of my favorites are Pearl and Beluga Bar. The latter is actually located in a mall, but don’t let that sway you: it might just be the better of the two.

photo 4My favorite restaurant on the island is Bolero Brasserie, which looks out over Front Street, so if you decide to sit on the second-story patio, you’ll get to watch the goings-on. However, I really like the dining room here, so I’d recommend sitting indoors, and grabbing a drink on the patio at Red Steakhouse afterward.

Speaking of cocktails, drinking might be Bermuda’s unofficial national past time. Harry’s is one of my favorite haunts—plus Jason is the only bartender on the island I’ve found so far who can make a decent brandy old fashioned! Their dinner menu is really fantastic as well, although I have to admit we’ve always eaten in the bar. Muse, also on Front Street near the ferry terminal, offers several interesting cocktails and three floors of eating and drinking space. They also have a menu of truly decadent French fare that is really, really tasty. If you’re a wine drinker, try the Wine Bar next to Little Venice on Bermudiana Road, just one block up from Front Street.

Off the beaten path a bit is Art Mel’s, which has been named the best fish sandwich on the island. There are several really good Indian restaurants as well, my favorite is House of India.

 

Enjoy and let me know when you visit the island!

Travel Guide: Toronto

My first impression of Toronto was blue glass studded with bright fall foliage. As you drive in from the airport, the first buildings to greet you once you actually get in to the city are tall, modern, glass skyscrapers, and behind that, the blue of the Great Lakes. We went at the perfect time of year: the air was crisp and the small deciduous trees planted in the well-landscaped green spaces between buildings were fiery shades of orange and yellow and red. It was stunningly beautiful.

We stayed in the financial district, which feels like you’re in the middle of everything when you arrive on a Friday afternoon—the sidewalks and underground tunnels are bustling, restaurants and bars are full of business people—but it’s deceptive. Come Saturday morning we discovered this is not the best area of town to spend a weekend—75% of businesses in the area shut down when the working crowd goes home.

IMG_4390I love that the city’s districts are very distinct. You know exactly when you’ve crossed the street from Chinatown to the Fashion District. Toronto is very walkable, with wide sidewalks and ample opportunities to cross busy streets—and everyone obeys walk signals. (Although Andrew attributes that to innate Canadian niceness). I loved the public art and design throughout the city and definitely could have spent another afternoon walking aimlessly, admiring it all!

IMG_4387We spent our evenings in the King West neighborhood, which seems to be pretty hip, but not over run with 20-something hipsters. (Man, I sound like a crotchety old lady.) Great restaurants abound and there’s a great nightlife scene—with plenty of taxis to get you home. We did have to wait in line to get in to the bar—the locals we were with said that if we had arrived before 10:00 we would have been good to go.

 

Highlights

Where to go: I spent some significant time in the fashion district. Every other store front seems to be a massive fabric store. I loved King Textiles—with roll upon roll upon roll of fabric (and real fashion designers placing orders!), it reminded me of Mood from Project Runway.

IMG_4380What to do: Lots of people told us about a giant mall near our hotel. I’m not usually a big mall shopper, but after a couple months in Bermuda, chain stores (and Auntie Anne’s!) are starting to become a welcome, American-feeling sight. We didn’t go to the CN Tower, but I’m kind of wishing we had—however, I’ve heard the food is not very good in the restaurant at the top, so best to just imbibe a cocktail and the view!

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Where to eat: We had some absolutely fantastic meals in Toronto—and yes, don’t worry we had poutine. I absolutely loved Sansotei Ramen. They have a handful of dishes that are really just very slight variations on pork belly ramen—I love when a restaurant is so sure of what they’re doing, they only offer you what they make best. Another standout was Buca—an Italian place in King West. The atmosphere is amazing, and so is the suckling pig! (Oh, and the cheese tray… mmmm… cheese….)

IMG_4370 copyEditor’s Note: This first guide is pretty short since we were only in town for the weekend. Do you have Toronto tips? Please feel free to share in the comments or send me an email! Interested in writing a travel guide? Email me at kristink_64@yahoo.com.